Translation of substances in safety data sheets (SDS)

Do substances actually have to be translated in safety data sheets? The short answer: Yes. But where can you source substance names in different languages? Translation of substances as an obligation (product identifier) In accordance with Section 31(5) of the REACH Regulation, the safety data sheet must be made available in an official language of […]

Do substances actually have to be translated in safety data sheets? The short answer: Yes. But where can you source substance names in different languages?

Translation of substances as an obligation (product identifier)

In accordance with Section 31(5) of the REACH Regulation, the safety data sheet must be made available in an official language of the member state in which the associated product will be put into circulation. Annex II, Part A, 1.1 of the same regulation states that the product identifiers and therefore the substance names should also be translated. In practice, I frequently encounter safety data sheets where the substances are specified in English. It is possible to identify the substances despite this, but it does not quite meet the specifications in the REACH Regulation.

Tips and sources for the translation of substances

Many substance translations can already be found on the ECHA homepage. You can search for the substance you require and then have the substance translations displayed, if available. Synonyms can also be found for some entries. If you want to translate substances which have a harmonised classification and labelling, then the substance names are included in the CLP Regulation, Annex VI and these should also be used accordingly. To provide assistance, translations into all languages have been provided since the 11th adaptation to technical progress (ATP) of the CLP Regulation. A look at the local translations of the 11th ATP or an updated (consolidated) version of the CLP Regulation in the language for which the translations are required may therefore be worthwhile. The substances can be found using the index number, which is identical in every translation of the CLP Regulation.   Sources: Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 (REACH Regulation), consolidated version, as of 28/04/2020 Guidance on the compilation of safety data sheets, Version 3.1 (German language version), European Chemicals Agency 2015, ISDBN 978-92-9247-514-7 CLP Regulation (EC) No. 1272/2008, consolidated version, status 01/05/2020

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